Premium Cedar Fencing

The Benefits of Fence and Deck Supply Fences

  • No surprises: Every board has been graded, ensuring that you’re getting the highest quality of Western Red Cedar.
  • Consistent supply: We maintain a well-stocked supply of all its cedar to meet all incoming orders. We maintain more products in our inventory at any one time than our competitors. If you need it, Fence and Deck Supply has it.
  • Dependability for your business: When it comes to pleasing your customers you don’t want any surprises. Cedar fencing products will help you build your business and make your clients happy ones.
  • Customer services: We provide tools and support resources that makes the sales process for distributors and installers easier.

To care for your new Cedar Fence consider the following ideas:

  • Consider staining, oiling or painting your Cedar fence. Paints will last the longest (up to 10 years) followed by stains (4 years) and oils (2 years).
  • Reapply a fresh coat periodically. Western Red Cedar is extremely resilient to weathering but if you want your fence looking the way you prefer and in top condition, remember to periodically add another coat when it’s the right time. Just remember to first clean your fence thoroughly before applying that fresh coat.
  • Perform periodic checks and patch cracks. By repairing breaks in your wood you’re keeping water from getting into the deeper structure of the fence. When it freezes this water will expand and push the wood further apart, resulting in a split.
  • Replace broken boards and reattach loose ones. Pets and children will try and find ways to get around or underneath your fence. Simple maintenance will help keep them from roaming outside your yard – or from getting in.
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When to Stain

I am often asked how soon you should stain your fence this is the answer that I have found:

The most common reason for staining a fence is two-fold; aesthetics (the look of the thing) and preservation (stain helps to extend the life of some types of wood). 

For untreated wood (except cedar) you can and in most areas should stain your fence immediately you finish putting it up. 
Semi-transparency or solid, latex/acrylic or oil based stains all work and have various pros and cons.
 

For cedar fences, personal taste is your best guide. This is one of the woods where preservation is less needed. Teak and cypress being two others (but the prices for these can be prohibitive). 
Good cedar will “silver” within a year or two, depending on your area, and the amount of “weather” you experience. If you like the look of silvered cedar, it is completely unnecessary to do anything but wait.
 
If, however, you do not like the “silvered” look, the fence will need to be stained, usually after the first year.
 

Pressure treated wood should be allowed to weather a bit before staining. It usually comes with a bit of color from the chemicals used in the process, so it is best to let that fade, particularly if you are using a semi-transparent stain. 
Depending on your area and the amount of “weather” you get this will take anywhere from 2 months to a year.
 
Once the wood has started to grey give it a good cleaning, allow it to dry, and then apply your stain.
 
If you are using a solid stain, the timing is less important, you can usually paint it with a solid stain within weeks of finishing your project.

Wood Fence as a Sustainable Green Product

  • You’re picking from a renewable resource. Every year Washington is among the top six states that plants new seedlings. Hundreds of millions of new trees are planted to replace the mature trees that are harvested, ensuring that new-growth forests will develop and be ready for harvesting 60 to 80 years from now.
  • Your fence is 100% bio-degradable. Years from now you can rest assured that the fence you purchased today can be chipped down, reused for other components or safely bio-degrade in a landfill without any harmful impact to the environment.
  • Making wood fences requires less energy. 47% of all materials made in America are from wood. However, the total energy needed to manufacture all of those wood products is only 4% of the energy required for all manufacturing. Concrete, chain-link, vinyl or ornamental iron can’t make that claim and all require more energy to manufacture their fence products. Wood is by far the best resource for making products that don’t require excessive amounts of energy, and that makes for sound choices for our environment
  • USA made. Most importantly, all of the wood fencing products sold by Fence and Deck Supply are made in the United States of America. CFC is proud to support US jobs from our renewable resources.

Anatomy of A Cedar Fence

After 25+ years of specialized fence building experience CFC Fences and Decks realizes that we have a tendency to speak almost a foreign language to customer exploring various fence styles and products. So in an effort to improve communication with our customers please allow us to clarify each individual piece and part of a typical fence as we reference them.

Post: This is the vertical piece of lumber that is cemented in the ground

Box Post: a hollow wood post constructed out of 2x material typically used to sleeve over chain link posts. (These posts have seams running the length of the posts )

Post Top: the upper end of a post often cut for decorative purposes (depending on the style)

Post Cap: a separate decorative piece that slips over the upper end of the post

Rail: a horizontal structural member typically a 2x material (1.5” thick). Rails are connected to the posts and slats are nailed to the rails.

Mid-Rail: also called center rail is placed as suggested by the name horizontally in the center, middle or any location between the top and bottom rail. These horizontal rails are typically the same thickness and use the same connection method as other rails.

Fascia: a piece of 1x material typically applied to match the aesthetics of the opposite side of the fence for certain neighbor friendly styles. While Fascia pieces are not as thick as rails, they are typically the same width as a 2x rail on the opposite side of the fence. Use of Fascia pieces allows for fencing that looks the same on both sides but is more cost effective.

Top Cap: This is a piece of lumber that sits flat on top of the fence, typically a piece of 2x material.

Slats/Pickets: this is a piece of lumber attached to the rails typically running vertical. While ¾” and 7/8” thick material is available, most slats are 5/8” thick, are 6’ long, and 3 ½” wide or 5 ½” wide

Butted Slats: a method of installing slats edge to edge (as the lumber dries space between slats naturally appears)

Overlapped Slats: a method of installing slats in a double layer where the edge of one slat overlaps the edge of another slat, some refer to this as a board on board style.

Section: this is the portion of fence between posts, also called a Fence Panel

Fence Line: this is a run of fence between two points

Lattice Top: a fence style with a window at the top portion of the fence section that contains thinner material that over laps in a square or diamond pattern

Spindle Top: a fence style with a window at the top portion of the fence section that contains only vertical pieces.

Footing: concrete encapsulating a post extending into the ground (below grade)

Fence Bracket: (Not typically used by CFC, unless requested prior to installation) usually a Simpson brand FB24. This is a bracket made of sheet metal bent to receive 2x rails and attach to a post.

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Top Six Reasons to Own a Wood Fence

1. Owning a wood fence improves the look of your property.
Having a wood fence will improve the aesthetic quality of your home or business. For example, Coastal Western Red Cedar’s earthy luster and pleasing aroma is enjoyed by most people and reminds them of the outdoors. If you ever want to put your property up on the real estate market, having an attractive Cedar fence will be a sound investment to make.

2. It shields you from the elements.
While your wood fence won’t keep the rain from falling on your head, it will help protect your property and family from the elements. Wood fencing helps shield your yard, home and gardens from blistering wind driven rain, freezing snow and the baking sun.

3. Having a wood fence brings you privacy and added security.
A wood fence keeps unwanted pets and visitors from wandering on your property, and they also keep the smaller members of your family and furry friends from wandering off! A gate can be easily built into your wood fence that can be locked from the inside; preventing strangers from entering but also letting you enjoy quick access to the outside.

4. You can make your fence fit your personality.
There are many different kinds of Cedar fencing styles to select from including Privacy Fencing, Dog-Eared tops, Estate, Lattice-Topped, Board-on-Board and many others.  You can also choose whether to have your Cedar fence stained. Ultimately, there’s no wrong way to pick or personalize your fence design – it’s entirely up to your own personal preference.

5. It will be around for years to come.
The built-in durability of a wood like Cedar makes it tough to stand up to the elements and changing temperatures. Cedar also exudes natural oils that bugs and fungi don’t like. With occasional maintenance work every 5-7 years, your fence will still look great 20 years or more down the road.

6. Affordability.
There is no other fencing material on the market which looks as appealing, last as long at such an affordable price as wood.

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Anatomy of the Cedar Fence

After 25+ years of specialized fence building experience Fence and Deck Supply realizes that we have a tendency to speak almost a foreign language to customer exploring various fence styles and products.  So in an effort to improve communication with our customers please allow us to clarify each individual piece and part of a typical fence as we reference them.

Post: This is the vertical piece of lumber that is cemented in the ground

Box Post: a hollow wood post constructed out of 2x material typically used to sleeve over chain link posts.  (These posts have seams running the length of the posts )

Post Top: the upper end of a post often cut for decorative purposes (depending on the style)

Post Cap: a separate decorative piece that slips over the upper end of the post

Rail: a horizontal structural member typically a 2x material (1.5” thick).  Rails are connected to the posts and slats are nailed to the rails.

Mid-Rail:  also called center rail is placed as suggested by the name  horizontally in the center, middle or any location between the top and bottom rail.  These horizontal rails are typically the same thickness and use the same connection method as other rails.

Fascia:  a piece of 1x material typically applied to match the aesthetics of the opposite side of the fence for certain neighbor friendly styles.  While Fascia pieces are not as thick as rails, they are typically the same width as a 2x rail on the opposite side of the fence.   Use of Fascia pieces allows for fencing that looks the same on both sides but is more cost effective.

Top Cap: This is a piece of lumber that sits flat on top of the fence, typically a piece of 2x material.

Slats/Pickets: this is a piece of lumber attached to the rails typically running vertical.  While ¾” and 7/8” thick material is available, most slats are 5/8” thick, are 6’ long, and 3 ½” wide or 5 ½” wide

Butted Slats:  a method of installing slats edge to edge (as the lumber dries space between slats naturally appears)

Overlapped Slats: a method of installing slats in a double layer where the edge of one slat overlaps the edge of another slat, some refer to this as a board on board style.

Section: this is the portion of fence between posts, also called a Fence Panel

Fence Line: this is a run of fence between two points

Lattice Top: a fence style with a window at the top portion of the fence section that contains thinner material that over laps in a square or diamond pattern

Spindle Top: a fence style with a window at the top portion of the fence section that contains only vertical pieces.

Footing: concrete encapsulating a post extending into the ground (below grade)

Fence Bracket: (Not typically used by Fence and Deck Supply, unless requested prior to installation) usually a Simpson brand FB24.  This is a bracket made of sheet metal bent to receive 2x rails and attach to a post.